May: Diplomacy didn't work in Syria due to Russian veto

Politics 4/16/2018, 5:35 PM
May: Diplomacy didn't work in Syria due to Russian veto

The military intervention by the United Kingdom, the United States and France against Syrian government forces conducted over the weekend was meant to "alleviate human suffering" that was exacerbated by the "use of chemical weapons against civilians," and not to facilitate regime change, or intervene in the civil war itself, said the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom Theresa May in her address to the members of the British parliament on Monday. "We cannot allow the use of chemical weapons to be normalized, either in Syria, or in the streets of UK," May stated, and explained that the decision to join the operation was made "in our national interest", not blindly following Washington.

May claimed that the military operation was designed "to maximize the destruction of stockpiled chemicals" and reiterated that "it's clear" that Assad's regime was responsible for developing and using the internationally banned weapons. The prime minister praised the support for the strikes that three Western powers received from their NATO allies and the EU officials.

May went on to blame Russia for the worsening of the humanitarian crisis in Syria, and claimed that it didn't do all it could to prevent the use of chemical weapons in the conflict, and used its veto power in the United Nations to block investigation of the sites where banned weapons were allegedly used.

Breaking the News / NI

Share: